Image

We are proud to announce that principal photography has begun on our next documentary My Friend: Standing Strong, a full-length feature on canine osteosarcoma.

Osteosarcoma (OSA) makes up about 5% of all canine tumors, but is by far the most common bone tumor of the dog.  Signs of this aggressive bone cancer are subtle, such as minor lameness, a hitch in the dog’s gate, a bit of swelling and maybe even some joint pain.  As in all cancers, early detection is important, so shining a light on symptoms so that owners can be proactive is one of the many reasons we decided to tackle OSA in this, our third canine cancer project.

Because of the aggressiveness of OSA, many owners are faced with very frightening choices.  Amputation of the affected limb is quite often necessary, leaving owners in turmoil.  Chemotherapy is needed due to the cancer’s high rate of metastasis.  The average life expectancy with amputation and chemotherapy is about one human year, but the equivalent of seven dog years. 

We want to show dog owners that there is more to this disease than amputation.  Dogs are resilient and as some say are born with three legs and a spare.  Osteosarcoma is not the end of the world for your dog, it is just a new beginning, whether it is amputation or limb-sparing there is a solution and an option for everyone.

Image
Our first interview at Cornell University Hospital for Animals was with William Kerr PhD Murphy Family Professor of Children’s Oncology SUNY Upstate Medical University and Angela McCleary-Wheeler DVM PHD DACVIM Oncology Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. Two great minds thinking together for both canines and children.
Image
Galina Hayes PhD DACVS DACVECC (Surgeon) sits for her interview at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. Great insight.
Image
Chris Frye DVM Assistant Professor Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation sits for an interview at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. Dogs are so resilient.
Image
Philippa Johnson BVSc CE RTUDI DIPECUDI MSC NRCUS (Radiology) gives us a quick on the fly interview then takes us to her lab for a look at OSA on radiographs and scans.
Image
Renee Sparrow LVT a vet tech at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine with her #tripawd Aspen gives her perspective on canine osteosarcoma.
Image
Stories of Benny a Rottweiler, osteosarcoma survivor and therapy dog from his owners A. J. Skiptunas D.O. & Kelly Skiptunas. Benny has passed, but the therapy continues with Spencer. Benny had a rare limb-sparing surgery and survived 5 years after diagnosis.
Image
Dr. Angela McCleary-Wheeler showing us around her lab for My Friend: Standing Strong Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine
Image
Director of the Cornell University Hospital for Animals Meg Thompson DVM shares her thoughts on Cornell’s path against cancer.
Image
Thank you Melissa Osgood, Assistant Director of Media Relations & Leadership Communication… without you none of this would have been possible including vacuuming the bean bag chair!
Image
Crew loading in… Directory Stacey Zipfel, Sound Mark Solomon and DP Scott Shelly
Image
Part of the beauty inside CUHA
Image
The iconic Clock Tower